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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
-based international academy of television, art, and sciences oversees the awards. its members include about 500 media and entertainment companies. >>> for an update on the weather forecast, here's mai shoji. mai? >>> indeed, it is the typhoon season, but one after another we have storms coming in. we have a couple of storms to talk about. let's start off with this one. this is the tropical storm maliksi. it is moving towards the islands. throughout the day tomorrow, the islands will be affected due to this storm and it will be intensifying into a secure tropical storm status by wednesday evening. from the afternoon, actually, it will be around this region, so it will be quickly moving away. maliksi is a fast-moving system. it will be picking up its pace tomorrow. but the ting that this will be doing is it will be enhancing the stationary boundary, which is just south of the eastern coast of the toho ka region. due to that earn jized stationary front, thunderstorms will be affecting the eastern region especially and some heavy down tour pours to be looking out for. another storm is the kami over the s
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
for inviting me. >> hong kong university of science and technology. very much appreciate your thoughts. let's give you a look at what's on the agenda in asia tomorrow. japan central bank begins its two-day policy meeting. the boj is likely to stand pat this time around but may signal more stimulus on the 30th of october. elsewhere, india posed september services pmi following strong numbers in august and cnbc will have an exclusive interview with malaysia's prime minister, so be sure to tune in for that. >>> back over this side of the world, business activity in the eurozone shows no sign of a rebound. the latest composite pmi figures for september fell to the low nest three years. france and spain saw a mild contraction as the country struggled with painful austerity measures. >>> meanwhile, growth in britain's sector services slowed in september. services pmi fell to 52.2 last month down from a reading of 53.7 in august. joining us now discuss is chris williamson, chief economist at market. good to have you onboard. i want to start out with the uk numbers because we've seen some move in t
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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